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Sept. 9, 2020 by Matthew Freeman

They Can't Breathe!

CPR Board President Rob Verchick is out with a new episode of the Connect the Dots podcast, the first in a new season focused on climate justice. As he puts it, "We’re looking at people living in the crosshairs of climate change, those disproportionately carrying the burden of the world and suffering on a daily basis."

As part of Rob's exploration of the issue in this episode, we hear from three experts on the topic, each with a different vantage point. CPR Member Scholar Maxine Burkett is a Professor of Law at the William S. Richardson School of Law, University of Hawai'i at Manoa. Leslie Fields is the Sierra Club's Senior Director of Environmental Justice and Healthy Communities. Mychal Johnson is co-founder of South Bronx Unite, a coalition of residents, organizations, and allies confronting policies that perpetuate harm and building support for viable community-driven solutions in the South Bronx.

Over the course of the episode, we hear Johnson describe the many ways that pollution is foisted off onto low-income communities – industrial facilities on their doorstep, highways running through their heart, truck routes that bring smog-emitting tractor-trailers puffing down their streets. Fields traces the history of environmental injustice, noting …

May 7, 2019 by Robert Verchick
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Pop quiz: What do marshes, pipelines, forests, and underground parking structures have in common?

The answer is they are all infrastructure – part of the "underlying foundation," as my dictionary puts it, "on which the continuance and growth of a community depend." A lot of that foundation, like pipelines and parking structures, is artificial. But most of the goods and services we rely on come from the natural environment, itself, like clean water, breathable air, and a stable climate.

Ideally, both kinds of infrastructure – gray and green – would work together to provide the food, transport, and energy we need. But the story of gray and green infrastructure is often one of conflict. In the Upper Midwest, oil pipelines tear through important forest habitat and spoil wetlands that filter water and are vital to the ecosystem. In Houston, six-lane highways have covered grasslands that used to slow …

May 15, 2018 by Matt Shudtz
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CPR President Rob Verchick recently sat down to talk with one of our newest Member Scholars, Professor Laurie Ristino of Vermont Law School, about the connections between climate change, food security, and policymaking tools like the Farm Bill that could be better used to promote sustainable agricultural practices.

We’re excited to share an audio recording of that conversation here as a “soft launch” of a new product at CPR – our “Connect the Dots” podcast. It’s a work in progress. Our first mini-series will focus on climate change adaptation, with episodes coming soon that explore issues related to climate-driven displacement, migration, and relocation; occupational health and safety protections; and water quality restoration in the United States.

In this first episode, Verchick and Ristino:

  • Define food security (0:50)  
  • Discuss the ways climate change affects food security, including changing rainfall, shifting growth seasons and crop yields, pests …

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CPR HOMEPAGE
More on CPR's Work & Scholars.
Sept. 9, 2020

They Can't Breathe!

May 7, 2019

Connecting the Dots Among Infrastructure, Community Needs, and Climate: Season Two of CPR's Signature Podcast

May 15, 2018

Connecting the Dots: Rob Verchick and Laurie Ristino Talk Food Security and Climate Change