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Showing 71 results

Michael C. Duff | April 15, 2022

At a Vestige of the Manhattan Project, a Fight over Workers’ Compensation and Intergovernmental Immunity

Under established constitutional law, states may generally not tax or regulate property or operations of the federal government. This principle is known as intergovernmental immunity. Congress may waive this federal immunity, however, and the scope of that principle is the major issue in Monday’s oral argument in United States v. Washington.

Ian Campbell | March 28, 2022

The Untold Story of Women’s Leadership of the Labor Movement

Women led the battle for industrial democracy — even before they won the vote. However, women’s contributions to and leadership of the organized labor movement, though lionized within the movement itself, have largely escaped public consciousness.

M. Isabelle Chaudry | March 24, 2022

Making History Today: These Women in Government Are Blazing New Paths

Women’s History Month isn’t just a time to recognize achievements made throughout the decades to advance women’s rights and demand equity. It’s also an opportunity to celebrate women making history today, the ones in our unwritten history books.

Jamillah Bowman Williams, M. Isabelle Chaudry | February 22, 2022

The Hill Op-Ed: Banning Workers from Suing Their Employer Hurts People of Color and Women Most

In a fair and just country, corporations are held accountable in the courts if their irresponsible behavior harms people. However, like many policies, the communities most impacted by forced arbitration are historically marginalized groups. Indeed, forced arbitration has a disproportionate impact on low-income Americans and Black and brown women when they are the victims of discrimination. Their abuse goes beyond the general adverse impacts of forced arbitration, noted in a new report by the Center for Progressive Reform.

David Driesen | January 27, 2022

The Death of Law and Equity

On the same day, the U.S. Supreme Court issued decisions governing requests for emergency stays of two rules protecting Americans from COVID-19. Both rules relied on very similar statutory language, which clearly authorized protection from threats to health. Both of them presented strikingly bad cases for emergency stays. Yet, the Court granted an emergency stay in one of these cases and denied it in the other. These decisions suggest that the Court applies judicial discretion unguided by law or traditional equitable considerations governing treatment of politically controversial regulatory cases.

Emily Ranson, M. Isabelle Chaudry | November 16, 2021

Maryland Matters Op-ed: Learning Lessons to Protect Workers through Pandemics

Although vaccination rates continue to rise and coverage on COVID-19 is fading away from prominent news dashboards, our rates are still higher than in summer 2020. While we still adapt to living and working with COVID-19, we must prepare for future public health emergencies so we do not lose another year figuring out our response.

M. Isabelle Chaudry | September 29, 2021

Pushing for a Heat Stress Standard in Maryland and Beyond

A recent Maryland law requires the state's Commissioner of Labor and Industry, in consultation with its Occupational Safety and Health Advisory Board, to develop and adopt regulations that require employers to protect employees from heat-related illness caused by heat stress. Those standards are due by October 2022. The law also requires the state to hold four public meetings to collect input from residents. This month, the Maryland Occupational Safety and Health Division (MOSH) scheduled those meetings, and I testified at the September 20 session.

Allison Stevens, Jennifer Nichols | September 8, 2021

Workers Aren’t ‘Burned Out.’ They’re ‘Getting Burned’ by the Lack of Policy Protections

Soaring rates of voluntary resignations, widespread labor shortages, and the ubiquity of "Help Wanted" signs put the "labor" back in the Labor Day holiday this year, as employers struggle to respond to a jobs market that seems, for once, to have given workers the upper hand. Story after story blames current labor market conditions on "burnout," an occupational phenomenon the World Health Organization describes as a combination of symptoms that includes emotional exhaustion and reduced personal accomplishment. "Burnout -- and opportunity -- are driving record wave of quitting," the Deseret (Utah) News declared in August. But what if the diagnosis -- or rather, what we call it -- is a symptom of the real problem? Naming the phenomenon for its toll on workers, rather than for the working conditions that drive it, skews our understanding of what's wrong and how to fix it.

Minor Sinclair | September 6, 2021

Labor Day 2021: This May Be the Best Year for Labor in a Generation

Economists are scratching their heads furiously — why is there a labor shortage amidst high unemployment? Everywhere employers are posting “Help Wanted” signs but still face shortage of workers. The last six months of worker disillusionment with the job market shows a new source of power: the power of workers when they withdraw the services of their labor.