LA Times Op-Ed: EPA Scientists Said Ban the Pesticide Chlorpyrifos. Scott Pruitt Said No

Carl Cranor

June 8, 2017

This op-ed originally ran in the Los Angeles Times.

Miners carried canaries into coal mines; if the canary died, it was an early warning of the presence of toxic gases that could also asphyxiate humans or explode. The Trump administration has decided to use children and farmworkers as 21st century canaries, continuing their exposure to a pesticide named chlorpyrifos that has been linked to serious health concerns.

The toxicity of this commonly used pesticide was demonstrated in early May when chlorpyrifos sprayed on a Bakersfield orchard drifted into a neighboring cabbage field, sickening a dozen farmworkers. One was hospitalized.

This is the same chemical that Scott Pruitt, the new administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency, refused to ban in March, despite the advice of EPA scientists.

In November 2016, EPA scientists reported that residues of chlorpyrifos on food crops exceed the federal safety standards for pesticides. Their analysis also found that in areas of extensive but permitted chlorpyrifos use, exposure to the chemical from drinking water exceeds levels safe for human consumption. Workers “who mix, load and apply chlorpyrifos pesticide products,” according to the analysis, face particular risks.

Chlorpyrifos is sprayed on turf and on agricultural fields, sometimes close to schools or residential areas. It is used on golf courses, playgrounds, row crops and fruit trees. Those working or playing in these areas come into direct contact with the pesticide.

Read the full op-ed on the Los Angeles Times website.

Read More by Carl Cranor
CPR HOMEPAGE
More on CPR's Work & Scholars.
May 25, 2022

After the Court Rules: Gaming out Responses to a Cutback in EPA Authority

May 24, 2022

What the Fifth Circuit Got Wrong About the 7th Amendment in Jarkesy

May 24, 2022

The Impacts on Climate: Chemicals in Cosmetics

May 23, 2022

Center Experts Lend Their Voices to Podcast on Environmental Justice and Chemical Disasters

May 19, 2022

Worker Safety Means Environmental Regulation

May 4, 2022

Clarifying the Congressional Review Act

May 2, 2022

Taking the Supreme Court's Temperature on Global Warming