Federalism 'Collisions' in Energy Policy

by Alexandra Klass | November 20, 2018

Originally published in The Regulatory Review. Reprinted with permission.

Like many areas of law, energy policy in the United States is both national and local. The boundary lines delineating federal and state authority are not always clear, leading to tension and disagreement between federal and state authorities. When tensions get too high, Congress can, and often has, stepped in to override state control in order to promote national interests. But when Congress faces partisan gridlock, an increasing number of disputes are resolved in the courts.

Over the past century, Congress has slowly carved out significant swaths of energy policy for federal control: oil and natural gas exports; automobile fuel economy standards; interstate transmission of electricity; permitting approval and eminent domain for interstate natural gas pipelines; and permitting approval for hydropower facilities and nuclear facilities. But much activity remains under state control: approval of interstate and intrastate oil pipelines and electric transmission lines; retail electricity and natural gas sales; approval of electric power generation facilities other than hydropower and nuclear, like wind farms, solar farms, coal plants, and natural gas plants; mandates on electric utilities to generate or purchase power from renewable energy resources; and standards for oil and gas drilling off of federal lands.

Legislation related to electricity and natural gas provides an example of how Congress has expanded federal jurisdiction in response to conflicts with states and between states. In the 1930s, Congress enacted the Natural ...

Trumping Innovation

by Joseph Tomain | March 21, 2017
Yale economist William Baumol has written extensively on the connection between innovation and economic productivity. He has demonstrated that the United States has long been committed to promoting innovation, and through innovation, virtuous circles of economic growth are created. Unfortunately, the current administration appears committed to curtailing, even stopping, that growth. The president's first budget has many targets. One, though, directly contradicts Baumol's research and, more problematically, directly contradicts the U.S. Constitution. From the Founding, it has been a fundamental ...

Uninformed and Unqualified: A Brief Run-Down of Rick Perry's Energy Department Nomination

by Alexandra Klass | January 23, 2017
There are few reasons for the Senate to confirm former Texas Governor Rick Perry as Secretary of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and many reasons to oppose his confirmation. He famously vowed to abolish the DOE when he ran for president in 2012 (along with several other federal agencies) but then could not even remember the name of the agency when asked about it during the Republican primary debates. One might have guessed at that time that he knew ...

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